Body Acne Map And What Is It Telling You

We recently discussed about face mapping and pimples that pop up on your face. I’ve received a lot of messages from you guys asking about body acne and how to figure out the best solution for different parts of your body.

So I came up with this article because as we did for the face we can do for the entire body. Mapping where pimples pop up on your body can tell you what’s wrong with your body and what’s the right solution to get rid of your body acne.

You must be aware that while both face and body acne can be caused by internal or external factors, body acne is more likely to be caused by external factors. This is good news because it can often be controlled and successfully cleared with external methods.

Body acne map

Some of the causes for popping up pimples in any of your body parts are:

  • body lotion;
  • sprays;
  • shower gels;
  • soap;
  • shampoo;
  • conditioner;
  • hair products;
  • laundry detergent;
  • fabric softener;
  • dryer sheets.

Here is the entire list of body acne causes and solutions:

1. Scalp acne

Causes:

  • Poor hygiene;
  • Sweat and oil build-up;
  • Not washing out hair products completely;
  • Wearing dirty hats;
  • Picking at scalp;
  • Constipation.

Solutions:

  • Wash hair regularly, but not so much that you dry out your scalp.
  • Switch shampoo, conditioner, and/or hair products.
  • Try dandruff shampoos or shampoos with tar, salicylic acid, or ketoconazole (Nizoral).
  • Avoid silicones, strong fragrances, and dyes in hair products.
  • Don’t pick at scalp.
  • Use an apple cider vinegar toner rinse on hair and scalp after washing (this also helps with an itchy scalp).
  • Avoid wearing hats for long periods of time because hats can trap sweat, heat, and grime in hair and scalp. Make sure hats are clean and dry.
  • Eat a healthy diet to promote good digestion and avoid constipation.

2. Neck acne

Causes:

  • Wearing shirts with tight collars;
  • Sweating and not showering afterwards;
  • Hormonal imbalances;
  • Too much sugar in diet.

Solutions:

  • Switch shampoo, conditioner, and/or hair products since they leave residue that can migrate down to the neck area.
  • Wear shirts without tight collars for good ventilation and less friction.
  • Change laundry detergents, fabric softeners, and/or dryer sheets.
  • Avoid strong fragrances and dyes in hair products, laundry products, and body lotions.
  • Shower after sweating and/or exercise.
  • Get hormones checked for imbalances, especially if neck pimples are near or under the chin and jawline.
  • Eat less refined sugar.

3. Back and shoulder acne

Causes:

  • Overly active sebaceous glands;
  • Sweating;
  • Not showering after exercise;
  • Friction and irritation from clothes or athletic gear;
  • Clothes are too tight and/or not breathable;
  • Backpack straps;
  • Pore-clogging body lotions;
  • Too much fried and high-calorie foods;
  • Not enough sleep;
  • Allergies;
  • Seborrheic dermatitis;
  • Folliculitis.

Solutions:

  • Shower after sweating and/or exercise.
  • Wear loose fitting clothes to air out your skin and so they don’t rub against your back.
  • Don’t wear clothes that are too tight. Clothes should be breathable (cotton fabric is the best).
  • Wash clothes and athletic gear regularly.
  • Wash and change bed sheets regularly.
  • Keep backpack straps loose so the straps don’t dig into your skin and aggravate any back acne.
  • Use non-comedogenic body lotions with minimal ingredients. Avoid fragrance, perfumes, and dyes. You can actually use face or baby lotion on your back since facial and baby products are usually formulated for more delicate skin.
  • Don’t over scrub your skin or shower with water that is too hot.
  • Don’t pick at any pimples on your back.
  • Switch body wash or soap. Use ones with fewer fragrances and dyes. Try either dandruff shampoo as a back wash or use a body wash with salicylic acid or AHAs in it.
  • Switch shampoos, conditioners, and/or hair products. These can migrate down your back in the shower or when you sweat, causing your back to break out.
  • Use laundry detergent, fabric softener, or dryer sheets for sensitive skin, with minimal fragrance and dyes.
  • Use an acne treatment product on your back such as salicylic acid (BHA), AHAs, or benzoyl peroxide. Back acne treatments are often available as sprays so you can apply them on hard to reach places. You can also spray or wipe on a homemade apple cider vinegar toner after showering. Alternatively, use alcohol-free witch hazel or tea tree oil. Keep in mind that some treatments will make your skin more sensitive to the sun.
  • Take a bath with sea salt once a week.
  • Eat less fried foods and high-calorie foods.
  • Get enough sleep .
  • Back acne can also be mistaken for allergies (ex. dust mites), dermatitis, or folliculitis.

4. Chest acne

Causes:

  • Sweating;
  • Not showering after exercise;
  • Friction and irritation from clothes;
  • Wearing clothes that aren’t breathable;
  • Undergarments;
  • Poor diet and eating habits;
  • Eating too much spicy food;
  • Drinking ice cold drinks all the time;
  • Fungal infection;
  • Allergies.

Solutions:

  • Shower after sweating and/or exercise.
  • Wear loose fitting clothes to air out your skin and so they don’t rub against your chest.
  • Wash clothes and bras regularly (especially if you get acne in between the boobs).
  • Don’t wear clothes that are too tight. Clothes should be breathable (cotton fabric is the best).
  • Use non-comedogenic body lotions with minimal ingredients. Avoid fragrance, perfumes, and dyes. You can actually use face or baby lotion on your chest since facial and baby products are usually formulated for more delicate skin. However, you don’t have to use a body lotion if your skin doesn’t need it.
  • Don’t over scrub your skin or shower with water that is too hot.
  • Don’t pick at any pimples on your chest.
  • Switch body wash or soap. Use ones with fewer fragrances and dyes. Try either dandruff shampoo on your chest or use a body wash with salicylic acid or AHAs in it.
  • Switch shampoos, conditioners, and/or hair products. These can migrate down your neck and chest in the shower or when you sweat, causing your chest to break out.
  • Use laundry detergent, fabric softener, or dryer sheets for sensitive skin, with minimal fragrance and dyes.
  • Use an acne treatment product on your chest such as salicylic acid (BHA), AHAs, or benzoyl peroxide. You can also spray or wipe on a homemade apple cider vinegar toner after showering. Alternatively, use alcohol-free witch hazel or tea tree oil. Keep in mind that some treatments will make your skin more sensitive to the sun.
  • If you get little whiteheads on your chest that don’t seem to respond to acne treatments, they could be a fungal infection instead.
  • The stomach meridian is on the chest, so chest acne can also be related to poor diet and/or food sensitivities and allergies. Avoid eating too much spicy food, drink room temperature or warm beverages, and avoid eating too much seafood and shellfish.

5. Butt and crotch acne

Butt acne causes:

  • Dirty underwear;
  • Underwear that is not breathable or too tight;
  • More common in humid, hot, summer weather;
  • Sitting too long;
  • Hair on butt often traps heat, sweat, and oil;
  • May be a rash instead;
  • Allergies;
  • Poor digestion;
  • Bloating;
  • Too many cold drinks;
  • Too much spicy food;

Crotch or pelvic acne causes:

  • Ingrown hairs from waxing or shaving;
  • Poor hygiene;
  • Could be warts or symptoms of an STD.

Solutions:

  • Practice good hygiene. Wash regularly (especially if you have hair on your butt!) and wear clean, breathable underwear that is not too tight.
  • Avoid sitting too long. Get up every hour and walk around to improve blood and air circulation.
  • Don’t use pore clogging lotions. Use non-comedogenic body lotions with minimal ingredients. Avoid fragrance, perfumes, and dyes.
  • Don’t pick or scratch at any pimples.
  • Switch body wash or soap. Use ones with fewer fragrances and dyes.
  • Switch shampoos, conditioners, and/or hair products. These can migrate down your body in the shower or when you sweat.
  • Use laundry detergent, fabric softener, or dryer sheets for sensitive skin, with minimal fragrance and dyes.
  • Use an acne treatment product on your butt pimples such as salicylic acid (BHA), AHAs, or benzoyl peroxide. You can also spray or wipe on a homemade apple cider vinegar toner after showering. Alternatively, use alcohol-free witch hazel or tea tree oil.
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables. Chew thoroughly to improve digestion and bloating.
  • Don’t drink ice cold drinks, especially early in the morning when you wake up and your body isn’t warm yet.
  • Acne on your crotch and pubic area can be treated by exfoliating that area with an AHA lotion or gel. If shaving, shave with the direction the hair grows instead of against.
  • Butt acne may be a rash or allergy instead.
  • Crotch acne may also be warts or symptoms of an STD (get these checked out by a doctor to be safe, especially if they itch, ooze, or don’t show any signs of improvement after 3-4 days).

6. Arm acne

Causes:

  • Similar causes to back acne;
  • Excessive oil secretion;
  • Clothes are too tight.

Solutions:

  • Shower regularly, especially after sweating or exercise.
  • Wear loose fitting clothes that are breathable and not too tight.
  • Use non-pore clogging body lotions and sprays with less fragrance and dyes.
  • Change laundry detergent, fabric softener, and dryer sheets.

7. Leg acne

Causes:

  • Clothes are too tight;
  • Ingrown hairs from shaving or waxing;
  • Allergic reaction or rash;
  • Keratosis pilaris or dermatitis.

Solutions:

  • Moisturize if skin is dry but use body lotions that are non-comedogenic and less rich and heavy.
  • Practice good hygiene.
  • Use a body wash that has salicylic acid (BHA) or glycolic acid (AHA) in it.
  • Change shampoo, conditioner, and hair products.
  • Change laundry detergent, fabric softener, or dryer sheets.
  • Wear loose fitting shorts, pants, and jeans.
  • Use a lotion with AHA in it to prevent ingrown hairs.
  • Shave in the direction hair grows instead of against it.
  • Often confused with allergic reactions or rashes, dermatitis, or keratosis pilaris.

Source: Skinacea

Body acne map

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